End Child Abuse Long Beach

End Child Abuse Long Beach
Child Abuse Prevention Program
www.EndChildAbuseLB.org

End Child Abuse Long Beach FAQ:

Q: Who determines what schools you do your presentations in?
A: Each school has the option to invite us in for a presentation. The school principal has the final word.
Q: How can I influence the principal to invite you in?
A: By asking directly and working with the teachers and PTA to gain support to ask the principal.
Q: How many schools have you presented in since July, 2002?
A: We have presented in 13 elementary schools totaling about 7,000 4th and 5th grade students.
Q: Does the Long Beach Unified School District recognize the Program?
A: Yes. Our curriculum is recognized by the LBUSD Health Curriculum Director.
Q: How do you know the information you present is valid?
A: The information presented is based on California State Law on Child Abuse. We attempt to make students aware of what is against the law and how they can help someone who is a victim.
Q: Are any of the staff paid?
A: No. The staff is 100% volunteer.
Q: How are you funded?
A: We are funded by contributions from generous donors. However, our budget is very small.
Presentation Questions: Q: What type of person commits sexual abuse?
A: Technically, one definition can be that they are "emotionally arrested". They are unable to draw a line between inappropriate and appropriate forms of affection.
Q: I think the material you cover should be done at home instead of in the school. What is your response?
A: We wish it were covered in home, and in most homes it is. However, there are homes that can benefit from the information we offer.
Q: When does abuse start when trying to administer discipline?
A: In general, use of the open hand applied to a clothed buttock (spanking) is acceptable. Otherwise, use of any object or closed hand is subject to being seen as abuse.
Q: What is the definition of INCEST?
A: Any sexual abuse of a child by a relative or other person in a position of trust and authority over the child. It is the violation of the child where he or she lives—literally and metaphorically. A child molested by a stranger can run home for help and comfort. A victim of incest cannot. Versions of this definition are widely used outside the courtroom by therapists and researchers. In court, incest definitions vary from state to state. In many states, the law requires that for incest to have taken place, vaginal penetration must be proved. So if a father rapes his child anally or orally he may be guilty of child sexual abuse but may not, legally, be guilty of incest.